SLIPKNOT Scores Third No. 1 Album On BILLBOARD Chart With 'We Are Not Your Kind'

SLIPKNOT Scores Third No. 1 Album On BILLBOARD Chart With 'We Are Not Your Kind'

According to Billboard, SLIPKNOT's "We Are Not Your Kind" sold 118,000 equivalent album units in the U.S. in its first week of release to land at position No. 1 on the Billboard 200 chart. Of that sum, 102,000 were in album sales.

The Billboard 200 chart ranks the most popular albums of the week in the U.S. based on multi-metric consumption as measured in equivalent album units. Units are comprised of traditional album sales, track equivalent albums (TEA) and streaming equivalent albums (SEA).

"We Are Not Your Kind"'s sales were boosted by a concert ticket/album sale redemption offer with SLIPKNOT's tour, which kicked off late last month.

The LP is SLIPKNOT's fifth top 10 effort on the Billboard 200. The Iowa-bases masked metallers previously landed in the top 10 with 2014's ".5: The Gray Chapter" (No. 1), 2008's "All Hope Is Gone" (No. 1), 2004's "Vol. 3: (The Subliminal Verses)" (No. 2) and 2001's "Iowa" (No. 3).

"We Are Not Your Kind" was once again recorded at a Los Angeles studio with producer Greg Fidelman, who engineered and mixed "Vol. 3: (The Subliminal Verses)" and helmed ".5: The Gray Chapter".

Earlier this year, singer Corey Taylor told the Des Moines Register that some of "We Are Not Your Kind" was written while he was forced to "figure out who I was" following his recent divorce, without relapsing into substance abuse.

"All I was doing was giving and I found myself absolutely, completely tapped," he said. "You could see it in my skin. You could see it in my eyes. That's basically the journey I'm going to take people on this album … show them what happens to depression when you have no chemicals to fall back on."

In a separate interview with BBC Radio 1's "Rock Show With Daniel P. Carter", Taylor said that SLIPKNOT's new album is "probably the furthest we've pushed the boundaries of creativity and experimentation, while also not losing our identity.

"There are bands out there who, they go for all of that experimentation and they forget who they are — they forget that there's an audience that wants to hear a certain type... It doesn't have to be the exact thing, but there has to be a certain emotion that they are looking for, that they wanna hear... There has to be that touchstone. You can go as far out as you want, but you have to be able to pull them back to that feeling that made them fans in the first place. And I really think we did that with this album. We not only went places that we've hinted at, musically, over the years, but never really went full-bore, but we're also doing heavier things than we've ever done."

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