Late WARRANT Singer's Ex-Wife Says He Admitted To Her He Was Once Drugged And Raped By Member Of Famous Heavy Metal Band

Late WARRANT Singer's Ex-Wife Says He Admitted To Her He Was Once Drugged And Raped By Member Of Famous Heavy Metal Band

Bobbie Brown, an actress and model and probably best known as the video vixen in WARRANT's "Cherry Pie" video, spoke to Fox News about her second book, "Cherry On Top", which was released last summer via Rare Bird Books. Subtitled "Flirty, Forty-Something And Funny As F**k", the tome, co-written with Caroline Ryder, is a sequel to Brown's 2013 memoir "Dirty Rocker Boys".

Brown, who met WARRANT singer Jani Lane on the set of the "Cherry Pie" video, married the musician in 1990 and had one daughter with Jani, Taylar Jayne Lane, before the couple divorced in 1993.

Lane died in August 2011 at age 47. Paramedics found his body in a Comfort Inn motel room in Woodland Hills, California, which is near Los Angeles. Lane had battled alcohol abuse for years.

According to Brown, Lane could have used the #MeToo movement during his early days on the Hollywood Sunset Strip after moving to the West Coast from Florida.

"At the moment that he admitted [he was drugged and raped by a member of a famous heavy metal band and their manager], it was devastating to hear," Brown told Fox News about the incident, which she wrote about in "Dirty Rocker Boys". "He admitted this to me before his death. It was traumatizing to watch him reveal those things and how much it had affected his life up to that point. When we were married, I had no clue. This occurred when he was just starting out on the Strip. So when I'm hearing all of this with him, I'm crying with him. I was going, 'We have to do something, we have to say something.' He was like, 'No! No!' It was a humiliation for a man to be in that position. It's so emasculating and humiliating. It would have been humiliating for him. So we couldn't say anything. Instead he lived with this anger inside. He felt like he couldn't say anything because he was a man. He was raised to be a man, not to cry. It was all mind-fucking. I could see how it would have been devastating and humiliating for him to speak up. I got his perspective from it, but at the same time, I felt so hopeless for him, knowing that he felt he couldn't say anything. And wouldn't. That affected him greatly his whole life. It was part of the reason he drank. It's sad, really."

Last summer, Brown told AL.com that she looked back on Lane's passing "with a lot of regret. I wish I would've handled things differently or seen things for what they really were, which was like somebody asking for help, instead of like an ex-wife being annoyed by her ex-husband asking her for shit," she said. "Now that I'm more mature and know the things that I know now that I did not know then, I wish I had been more aware of certain things and was more knowledgeable of things that had transpired with him, because we went through a while there where we were bitter, but then we were friends in the end. And we were very close in the end. That's when I came to know a lot of things that I never even knew when we were married and it was devastating.

"It so hard to understand, when you see somebody with so much talent and so much love and admiration and so much going for them, and all that they've accomplished and beautiful children and you're like, 'Why are you so sad?'" she continued. "But it's all the things that they've been suppressing and not talking about for so many years that eventually eats them alive, I think, or they feel humiliated, that they don't want to discuss and are traumatized by. And as men, it's so hard to feel that. I guess because y'all are raised, 'don't cry,' 'that's weak,' that kind of thing, and he was definitely raised in that environment. I just feel like it's hard for men to be able to move forward and be okay with shit that happened and change and grow from that.

"So yeah, there just so much I didn't learn until later on," she added. "I wish I could've known, and maybe I could've been more of a help or a voice of reason. Who knows. I wish things would've been different. I wish I could've done more. I wish he could've felt comfortable being open and talking about things much sooner. I wish he were still here for my daughter and her sister and still making people happy, because he was a good person. And he just had traumatizing PTSD from shit that happened to him and just couldn't deal with it, and that sucks because his talent is gone."

A few years ago, Brown starred in a reality series called "Ex-Wives Of Rock", which premiered in August 2012 on the Canadian network Slice and was co-produced by the FEMME FATALE frontwoman Lorraine Lewis.

COMMENTS

To comment on a BLABBERMOUTH.NET story or review, you must be logged in to an active personal account on Facebook. Once you're logged in, you will be able to comment. User comments or postings do not reflect the viewpoint of BLABBERMOUTH.NET and BLABBERMOUTH.NET does not endorse, or guarantee the accuracy of, any user comment. To report spam or any abusive, obscene, defamatory, racist, homophobic or threatening comments, or anything that may violate any applicable laws, use the "Report to Facebook" and "Mark as spam" links that appear next to the comments themselves. To do so, click the downward arrow on the top-right corner of the Facebook comment (the arrow is invisible until you roll over it) and select the appropriate action. You can also send an e-mail to blabbermouthinbox(@)gmail.com with pertinent details. BLABBERMOUTH.NET reserves the right to "hide" comments that may be considered offensive, illegal or inappropriate and to "ban" users that violate the site's Terms Of Service. Hidden comments will still appear to the user and to the user's Facebook friends. If a new comment is published from a "banned" user or contains a blacklisted word, this comment will automatically have limited visibility (the "banned" user's comments will only be visible to the user and the user's Facebook friends).