LACUNA COIL's CRISTINA SCABBIA Feels 'Bulletproof' After Losing Both Her Parents In 'A Very Short Period Of Time'

LACUNA COIL's CRISTINA SCABBIA Feels 'Bulletproof' After Losing Both Her Parents In 'A Very Short Period Of Time'

LACUNA COIL singer Cristina Scabbia has revealed in a new interview with NME that losing both her parents between the release of 2016's "Delirium" and this year's "Black Anima" albums taught her "so much" about herself. "They literally were the world to me," she said. "We'd talk every day. Multiple times a day. It was so shocking to me to lose them."

She continued: "It happens. They lived a long happy life and I was lucky to have them for so long. But I have realized that I am much stronger than I thought I was. For years before, I was trying to prepare myself for it happening. I was trying to visualize how I'd cope. I used to tell myself what it would be like. I thought I'd lock myself indoors, shut out my friends and be completely depressed — and then I learned that you do just go on. You have to carry the torch. I feel bulletproof now. I've lost the most important thing in the world to me, and I'm still here."

Scabbia also talked about the "Black Anima" artwork and theme, which was inspired in part by the book "The Physics Of Angels: Exploring The Realm Where Science And Spirit Meet" by Rupert Sheldrake and Matthew Fox. Asked which side of the fence she falls on — team science or team theology, Cristina said: "Science. 100%. Actually, let's call it 80%. I still understand the spiritual part and I do hope there is something in us that lasts. I want to believe my loved ones are still around me in the form of energy, but I don't have any proof. That stops me from blindly believing. Obviously, Italy is a very religious country. We have the Pope. But while I grew up going to church — my parents were believers — I never did believe. I used to just be confused why I had to go to church every week. I didn't understand why people didn't behave like they said they did in church. I always thought it was more important to be a good human being, to be a respectful human being, without any fear of God attached to it."

"Black Anima" was released on October 11. Scabbia previously described the LP's musical direction as "heavier and darker" than the band's past efforts. "I don't think that LACUNA COIL has ever been so heavy," she told HardDrive Radio. "And it will be surprising a lot of people, because we experimented a lot of things differently — vocally and musically."

LACUNA COIL and ALL THAT REMAINS have joined forces for the "Disease Of The Anima" North American co-headlining tour. The trek includes special guests BAD OMENS, EXIMIOUS and UNCURED.

Image courtesy of Loud TV

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