GREAT WHITE's MARK KENDALL Defends Voicing His Conservative Views On Social Media: 'I've Always Considered Myself Hopefully Sensible'

GREAT WHITE's MARK KENDALL Defends Voicing His Conservative Views On Social Media: 'I've Always Considered Myself Hopefully Sensible'

GREAT WHITE guitarist Mark Kendall spoke to the "Music Mania" podcast about what it's like to be a conservative voice on social media despite the stereotype of the musical community as a haven for liberals. He said (hear audio below): "My parents were full-blown liberals. I've never been into politics at all. I've just always kind of considered myself hopefully sensible. And when things are so out of whack that it makes no sense at all even to the most illogical person, I feel like I have to say something, 'cause I really want my grandson to grow into a regular-type world and not one that's dangerous or whatever.

"I try not to get too outrageous, but I do get a little bit upset," he continued. "I'd rather promote helping alcoholics, to tell you the truth. Lately, I've been laying back a little bit on it, 'cause I don't really feel like I'm gonna change the world or whatever, but I just think it's getting a little too dangerous out there, getting a little too out of control. There's gotta be a better way to do it."

Kendall also touched upon the racial unrest in the United States following the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade and many other black people who have died at the hands of the police.

"I wish everybody could come together," he said. "I know there's two sides or whatever, and I totally get that — it's always been that way. But I don't think leveling our country is the answer. I don't want people to be mad at me. I hate to see innocent people losing their businesses and losing their livelihood, and they really have nothing to do with anything except they're just trying to make a living. I don't think that's fair, and I don't think that's out of whack to feel that way.

"We all saw what happened to the George Floyd guy, and we were all sickened by that. But I just don't feel that we have to just destroy our country and turn it into Afghanistan over it. I like the idea of maybe doing police reform, doing things that… maybe body cams.

"I have a buddy who's a detective in Reno, and what he told me is, he goes, 'If some guy that's not quite there mentally, but he skates through the academy, usually they'll fail the mental test.' Like, they might ask him something like, 'What if you found out your partner's gay?' And he'd say something like, 'Before or after I kicked his ass?' That guy would not be a police officer — [he'd be] outta there in a second. But occasionally a bad apple slips through. They'll usually get him early, but somehow this guy that did what he did obviously needed to be dealt with earlier. But I just don't think every cop is bad or whatever. And again, I'm just trying to be logical.

"I try to treat everybody well, so I'm not out there trying to injure anyone by speaking my piece. I want things to go well for everybody. But I'm a little concerned about what's going on out there right now."

Last month, Kendall made political headlines when President Donald Trump retweeted a video Mark posted of a man being assaulted by a group of protestors in Dallas after he had initially charged at them with a machete while reportedly trying to protect a store. Kendall reportedly labeled the Dallas incident — without proof — as the work of Antifa. Through his publicist, Kendall declined to say what basis he had for his Antifa claim, according to The Dallas Morning News.

On Twitter, Kendall lauded the president for vowing to treat Antifa as a terrorist group, writing: "Democrats & progressives support Antifa financially who are destroying our country day by day."

GREAT WHITE is currently working on material for its next album. The effort will mark GREAT WHITE's first collection of new songs with singer Mitch Malloy, who joined the group in 2018 following the departure of Terry Ilous.

Ilous, frontman of '80s L.A. hard rockers XYZ, joined GREAT WHITE in 2010 after stepping in for touring vocalist Jani Lane (WARRANT).

The Ilous-led GREAT WHITE released two albums, 2012's "Elation" and 2017's "Full Circle", before Terry was dismissed from the group.

This version of GREAT WHITE is not to be confused with JACK RUSSELL'S GREAT WHITE, which features original GREAT WHITE singer Jack Russell alongside Robby Lochner (FIGHT) on guitar, Dan McNay on bass, Tony Montana on guitar and Dicki Fliszar on drums.



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