DAVE LOMBARDO Talks About Art Piece 'Broken Angel' (Video)

DAVE LOMBARDO Talks About Art Piece 'Broken Angel' (Video)

Former SLAYER and current PHILM drummer Dave Lombardo has collaborated with art team SceneFour on an art collection, "Rhythm Mysterium", built from the new medium of rhythm-on-canvas.

A short video clip of Lombardo talking about what he sees in his art piece "Broken Angel" can be seen below.

SceneFour is the Los Angeles-based creativity house that has spearheaded the "collaborative art" movement through groundbreaking canvas work with the likes of RZA of WU-TANG CLAN, Chuck D of PUBLIC ENEMY and Bootsy Collins.

After accepting an invitation to be one of SceneFour's artist drummers, Lombardo was photographed in the dark using an array of drumsticks and rhythmic accessories that produce light, much like a painter utilizing brushes and oils. The movements featured within the captured rhythms were then studied and developed into abstract artwork. Lombardo selected and named the dozen pieces featured in the collection, while each numbered canvas in the series is signed by the man himself.

From the moment he first sat down to do the session, Lombardo knew it would be an unforgettable experience.

"Where we photographed the pieces was very inspiring," Lombardo told music writer Joel Gausten. "It was in a kind of warehouse in Downtown Los Angeles, so it sounded really good. It was just a big, cavernous room. I just went off, and they started snapping pictures... At certain points, as I noticed the way they were shooting the pictures and everything, I realized, 'Wow, I could really make this picture look better if I give it my flair or my style."

He continued: "When I'm on stage, I've noticed that I swing my arms a little more. My movements are more exaggerated. I don't restrain myself when I play; my arms are swinging all over the place. So in this environment, instead of just doing a solo for myself, I gave it that live performance feel. That's why I feel that these pictures show a little more excitement, because of the way I approached the drumming."

COMMENTS

To comment on a BLABBERMOUTH.NET story or review, you must be logged in to an active personal account on Facebook. Once you're logged in, you will be able to comment. User comments or postings do not reflect the viewpoint of BLABBERMOUTH.NET and BLABBERMOUTH.NET does not endorse, or guarantee the accuracy of, any user comment. To report spam or any abusive, obscene, defamatory, racist, homophobic or threatening comments, or anything that may violate any applicable laws, use the "Report to Facebook" and "Mark as spam" links that appear next to the comments themselves. To do so, click the downward arrow on the top-right corner of the Facebook comment (the arrow is invisible until you roll over it) and select the appropriate action. You can also send an e-mail to blabbermouthinbox(@)gmail.com with pertinent details. BLABBERMOUTH.NET reserves the right to "hide" comments that may be considered offensive, illegal or inappropriate and to "ban" users that violate the site's Terms Of Service. Hidden comments will still appear to the user and to the user's Facebook friends. If a new comment is published from a "banned" user or contains a blacklisted word, this comment will automatically have limited visibility (the "banned" user's comments will only be visible to the user and the user's Facebook friends).