Why It's Unlikely SEBASTIAN BACH Will Ever Stop Performing SKID ROW Songs

Why It's Unlikely SEBASTIAN BACH Will Ever Stop Performing SKID ROW Songs

Former SKID ROW singer Sebastian Bach was interviewed on a recent edition of "The Metal Gods" rock show. You can now listen to the chat using the SoundCloud widget below. A couple of excerpts follow.

On whether he would ever consider playing nothing but solo material during one of his concerts and do away with all the SKID ROW songs:

Bach: "That would take a lot of rehearsal. I've been playing SKID ROW songs for 25 or 26 years, so it's like muscle memory to sing those songs. If I was to do a full set of nothing but solo material, it would take about two weeks of intense rehearsals, and bands really don't rehearse that much anymore. [Laughs] It's a crazy thing, but… It's gonna blow people's minds… It blows my mind… I have to pay my band to rehearse. That's the way it is [with] the music industry these days. When I started out, that was unheard of — nobody got paid to rehearse. But somehow nowadays, that's, like, the way it is. So we all tend to rehearse on our own before a tour, and have a day of rehearsal or whatever. It's not possible for me to do a full set of my solo material without a couple of weeks of intense rehearsal, because it's very challenging music and it's not been played live at all, some of these songs from the new record. So that would take a lot of work. I don't know if the fans even want me to do that. So I don't see that happening in the near future. I would love to do that. But that's more up to the fans than me. If the fans demand it, then that will happen."

On his upcoming autobiography:

Bach: "I would like it to be a positive, uplifting book. When I read page after page after page of how wasted and fucked up and drunk or high some guy got, after, like, page 75, it becomes sad to me; it's not glamorous or interesting. 'I got fucked up, I got drunk, I got high, I shot heroin, I snorted blow, I got drunk, I got fucked up, I got so drunk...' To me, that becomes boring after chapter 12 or whatever. Like, there'll be some of that in my book, obviously. But anybody can be drunk, anybody can be a junkie. Nobody can play the drums like Neil Peart from RUSH. That's interesting, that's something that's remarkable and rare. And when I read a book by Neil Peart, it's not the lowest common denominator, like the dreads of society or the worst things that you can think of. Actually, the opposite of that; it's the most positive things that he [chooses] to put down on a page. I just read Paul Stanley's book, 'Face The Music', and it was incredible; it was a great book. It's very inspiring and uplifting and I couldn't put it down, and I was sad when I got to the last page, 'cause it was a pleasure to read and it was inspiring. There was stuff that I didn't know. I've been a KISS fans since I was a little boy and every page of Paul Stanley's book was things I did not know. I was amazed that he kept such mystery throughout his whole life and career that he was not talking about until now; I was just amazed at that. So I would like my book to have that revelation factor, like, 'Wow! I didn't know that.' And, 'I didn't realize this.' That would be interesting to me."

On performing at The Garage in Glasgow in June 2012 on a stage that had a pole in the middle of it:

Bach: "It's very frustrating for me, at my age, in my mid-40s, to travel across the world, the planet, to sing on a stage with a pole in the middle of the stage. I'm, like, why do I go through all of this effort for this? [Laughs] I'm too old for that. I mean, maybe when I was 19, or 18, I'd be, like, 'Great,' but in your mid-40s, it's, like, 'What the fuck am I here for?' Honestly. That's just the way it is. People can say, 'Oh, he's a in a bad mood.' I'm not a teenager, I'm in my mid-40s and I don't wanna sing on a stage with a pole in the middle of the stage; I just don't want to. Let me have a proper stage. And especially when there is a stage in the building that I could go play on, but I am playing on this one. And it's, like, 'What the fuck?' But whatever. You can't change things like that. It's quite a long distance to travel from Los Angeles to Glasgow, Scotland. So I would like to give the fans the best show I can. I can't do that on a stage like that; it's impossible. I can't give you your rock and roll dream come true with a fucking pole in front of my face. It's not the dream that we collectively shared together. [Laughs] I had a different dream. I don't know about you. [Laughs]"

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