Late ALICE IN CHAINS Singer's Car Being Offered For Sale

A 2000 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am WS6 car which once belonged to ALICE IN CHAINS singer Layne Staley is being sold by the band's longtime employee Tavis via the official AIC forum.

In a post on the forum, Tavis writes: "Hey folks my name is Tavis... I have worked for AIC for a long while. Some of you already know me. Layne's estate asked me if I would sell his car for them and I of course said I would. We wanted to give you fine folks first option on purchasing the car being it would actually mean something more to you than a non-fan. The car is a 2000 Pontiac Firebird Trams Am with 26,000 miles on it. It is fully loaded with T-Tops and the Ram Air and WS6 package upgrades with dual leather electronic controlled bucket seats, stereo upgrade package with a trunk mounted 12-disc changer. 6-speed Transmission. There are many options on this car that Layne personally ordered from the factory... I will not get into a debate about price being it will be through private messages. Any questions about the car make here, please."

A 1999 "Rockline" interview excerpt in which Layne talks about buying the car can be streamed in the YouTube clip below. Photos of the car are available here.

Staley died on April 5), 2002 at the end of a long and tragic descent into heroin addiction that ultimately sidelined his career and his band after three studio albums, an acoustic live disc and two EPs. The 34-year-old singer had all but disappeared from public view during the last few years of his life. His body was not found in his Seattle home until April 20, 2002, two weeks after the date on which it was ultimately determined that he died.

Staley was born in Kirkland, Washington on August 22, 1967 and began playing drums at the age of 12. He soon switched to singing and met guitarist Jerry Cantrell in 1987. The pair formed ALICE IN CHAINS, which started out as a glam band but eventually became one of Seattle's biggest "grunge" exports.

ALICE IN CHAINS guitarist Jerry Cantrell told The Pulse Of Radio a while back that artists like Staley didn't come around very often. "Layne was a very unique, one-of-a-kind guy," he said. "There's, like, a handful of those guys in music, for every generation, that are that unique and that hard to cop, but a lot of people try. [laughs] But there's a lot of people that feel the weight of what that guy brought to music and have been influenced by it."



(Thanks: "dobegrrrl")

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