ANGUS YOUNG And Brother Became Closer After MALCOLM YOUNG's Dementia Diagnosis

ANGUS YOUNG And Brother Became Closer After MALCOLM YOUNG's Dementia Diagnosis

AC/DC guitarist Angus Young (pictured) says that he has grown closer to his brother Malcolm since the founding AC/DC axeman was diagnosed with dementia, a brain disorder that interferes with a person's ability to carry out everyday tasks.

"His symptoms started around the 'Black Ice' tour' [during 2008-2010], but he said he wanted to continue," Angus told Bang Showbiz. "I kept asking him if he wanted to go on and he did. Then, when he'd seen a few different people and was diagnosed, he said he would go on with the band for as long as he could play.

"Did it make us closer? Yes, for sure," he continued. "Even when he was ill. When touring, he didn't have great days. So I'd sit with him and we'd talk. He'd surprise me, by talking about things such as how we should do some open-air shows. But then he's always been our leader and it was just good to have that feedback."

The Sydney Morning Herald reported in September that Malcolm was being treated in a nursing home in Sydney, Australia. The facility is believed to be Lulworth House in Elizabeth Bay. A Young family connection told the newspaper, "If you were in the room with [Malcolm] and walked out, then came back in one minute later, he wouldn't remember who you are. He has a complete loss of short-term memory. His wife, Linda, has put him in full-time care."

Malcolm did not participate in the recording sessions for AC/DC's new studio album, "Rock Or Bust", which is set to arrive on December 2.

His replacement on the album and the band's upcoming world tour will be Stevie Young, nephew of Malcolm and AC/DC guitarist Angus Young.

The band officially announced in September that Malcolm would not be returning to the lineup.

Stevie Young played with AC/DC once before during a 1988 tour, while Malcolm stepped out to deal with his dependency on alcohol.

Dementia can be reversed when it's caused by dehydration or other treatable conditions. But most forms of dementia worsen gradually over time and can't be corrected.

According to WebMD, the average survival time for people diagnosed with dementia is about four and a half years. However, those diagnosed before age 70 typically live for a decade or longer.

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